Well Fed Means Less Lead

Lead can hurt your family.

Lead is a metal that our bodies don’t need. Too much lead in our bodies can cause problems, especially for children.

Children exposed to too much lead may not look or act sick but may have problems with growth and learning.

Avoid

  • Storing foods in imported lead-glazed pottery or leaded crystal
  • Fruits or vegetables grown in lead-contaminated soil
  • Foods or drinks made with lead-contaminated water
  • Letting children eat or chew on chipping or peeling paint

Eat Fewer

  • Fried foods
  • High fat meats such as sausage, bacon and hot dogs
  • Foods cooked with fatty meats, butter and lard
  • High fat snacks such as chips and cakes

Protect your family from lead with healthy foods!

3 Key Nutrients

Good Nutrition

Good nutrition is one way to protect your family from lead.
For children and adults, three key nutrients can play a role in protecting the body from the harmful effects of lead:
These nutrients help the body absorb less lead and are part of a healthy diet. Choose a variety of foods daily.
For babies, breast milk provides the best nutrition and many health benefits from the start.

SOURCES OF CALCIUM INCLUDE:

SOURCES OF IRON INCLUDE:

SOURCES OF VITAMIN C INCLUDE:

Meal Planning

It is important that your family has regular meals and snacks. This may help keep lead from being absorbed.
Ask your WIC Nutritionist for ideas on healthy food choices and serving sizes.
Eat More
Remember — Always wash your hands before you eat!
Talk with your health care provider about lead testing for your child. For more information on lead, contact the Indiana Lead and Healthy Homes Program at:

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Side-Lying Hold

  1. For the right breast, lie on your right side with your baby facing you.
  2. Pull your baby close. Your baby’s mouth should be level with your nipple.
  3. In this position, you can cradle your baby’s back with your left arm and support yourself with your right arm and/or pillows.
  4. Keep loose clothing and bedding away from your baby.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Cross-Cradle Hold

  1. For the right breast, use your left arm to hold your baby’s head at your right breast and baby’s body toward your left side. A pillow across your lap can help support your left arm.
  2. Gently place your left hand behind your baby’s ears and neck, with your thumb and index finger behind each ear and your palm between baby’s shoulder blades. Turn your baby’s body toward yours so your tummies are touching.
  3. Hold your breast as if you are squeezing a sandwich. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Instead, bring your baby to you.
  4. As your baby’s mouth opens, push gently with your left palm on baby’s head to help them latch on. Make sure you keep your fingers out of the way.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Clutch or “Football” Hold

  1. For the right breast, hold your baby level, facing up, at your right side.
  2. Put your baby’s head near your right nipple and support their back and legs under your right arm.
  3. Hold the base of your baby’s head with your right palm. A pillow underneath your right arm can help support your baby’s weight.
  4. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Bring baby to you instead.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Cradle Hold

  1. For the right breast, cradle your baby with your right arm. Your baby will be on their left side across your lap, facing you at nipple level.
  2. Your baby’s head will rest on your right forearm with your baby’s back along your inner arm and palm.
  3. Turn your baby’s tummy toward your tummy. Your left hand is free to support your breast, if needed. Pillows can help support your arm and elbow.
  4. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Instead, bring your baby to you.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Laid-Back Hold

  1. Lean back on a pillow with your baby’s tummy touching yours and their head at breast level. Some moms find that sitting up nearly straight works well. Others prefer to lean back and lie almost flat.
  2. You can place your baby’s cheek near your breast, or you may want to use one hand to hold your breast near your baby. It’s up to you and what you think feels best.
  3. Your baby will naturally find your nipple, latch, and begin to suckle.

This hold is useful when: