4½ TO 5 YEARS

I’m growing up strong.

Thank you for helping me learn how to stay healthy.

I will soon be 5 years old, but I still have plenty of growing to do. Help me keep my body healthy.

Breakfast Starts My Day

It is hard to think or listen when I’m hungry. Eating breakfast gives me energy to learn. Let’s plan breakfast together. We can set the table with a box of cereal, bowls, and spoons. In the morning, we can get out the milk and fruit. Breakfast can be easy!

Here are some examples of what meal and snack portion sizes might look like on my plate.

Breakfast

1 small sliced banana
½ cup water
1 cup whole grain cereal
with 1 cup low-fat milk

Lunch

½ sliced orange
½ cup cut up cucumber
1 cup low-fat milk
1 tablespoon fruit jam
on 2 slices whole grain bread
with 2 tablespoons peanut butter

Snacks

½ cup diced strawberries
with ½ cup low-fat yogurt
5 small, sliced carrots
with ¼ cup chickpea hummus
 2 or 3 whole grain crackers
with 1 stick string cheese, quartered lengthwise
 Raisins in 1 small oatmeal cookie
water between meals and snacks

Dinner

½ cup large, sliced strawberries
1 cup mixed, green salad with 1 tablespoon dressing
½ cup water
½ cup cooked whole grain pasta
3 tablespoons baked, chopped chicken
2 or 3 cubes cheese

Daily Suggested Food Group Amounts

Fruits

3 servings a day
1 serving = ½ cup
(1½ cups total)

Cooked or soft, raw fruit.

Mashed, sliced, or chopped.

Offer a variety: red, yellow, orange, blue, and green.

Vegetables

3-4 servings a day
1 serving = ½ cup
(1½ – 2 cups total)

Mashed, sliced, or chopped veggies.

Offer a variety: dark green, orange, red, yellow, and purple.

Grains

8-10 servings a day
1 serving = ½ ounce
(4-5 ounces total)

Whole grain bread, tortillas, rice, or noodles.

Dry or cooked cereal.

Grains

8-10 servings a day
1 serving = ½ ounce
(4-5 ounces total)

Whole grain bread, tortillas, rice, or noodles.

Dry or cooked cereal.

Proteins

3-5 servings a day
1 serving = 1 ounce
(3-5 ounces total)

Cooked lean meat, poultry, or seafood.

Eggs.

Cooked beans, peas, or tofu.

Peanut butter.

Proteins

3-5 servings a day
1 serving = 1 ounce
(3-5 ounces total)

Cooked lean meat, poultry, or seafood.

Eggs.

Cooked beans, peas, or tofu.

Peanut butter.

Dairy

5 servings a day
1 serving = ½ cup
(2½ cups total)

Low-fat milk.

Yogurt.

Cheese.

Dairy

5 servings a day
1 serving = ½ cup
(2½ cups total)

Low-fat milk.

Yogurt.

Cheese.

Look what I can do!

Keep me safe and healthy.

Take me to the doctor for my check-up. We can see how much I’ve grown. Visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules to see when I am due for shots.

Remind me to brush and floss my teeth every day. Take me to the dentist to get my teeth checked.

Washing our hands helps us stay healthy. We should wash them often for at least 20 seconds with warm water and soap.

I need simple rules. Set limits on when, where, and how often we have screen time. Talk about what I’m learning as we watch together, and keep me safe from what I shouldn’t see. Let’s focus on each other during meals and snacks, not a screen.

Avoid tobacco or nicotine products, alcohol, marijuana, and other illegal drug use to keep our family healthy and safe. For support with quitting tobacco or nicotine products, visit www.quitnow.net. For support with quitting alcohol or other drugs, visit www.findtreatment.gov. Your WIC Nutritionist can also provide additional resources.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Side-Lying Hold

  1. For the right breast, lie on your right side with your baby facing you.
  2. Pull your baby close. Your baby’s mouth should be level with your nipple.
  3. In this position, you can cradle your baby’s back with your left arm and support yourself with your right arm and/or pillows.
  4. Keep loose clothing and bedding away from your baby.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Cross-Cradle Hold

  1. For the right breast, use your left arm to hold your baby’s head at your right breast and baby’s body toward your left side. A pillow across your lap can help support your left arm.
  2. Gently place your left hand behind your baby’s ears and neck, with your thumb and index finger behind each ear and your palm between baby’s shoulder blades. Turn your baby’s body toward yours so your tummies are touching.
  3. Hold your breast as if you are squeezing a sandwich. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Instead, bring your baby to you.
  4. As your baby’s mouth opens, push gently with your left palm on baby’s head to help them latch on. Make sure you keep your fingers out of the way.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Clutch or “Football” Hold

  1. For the right breast, hold your baby level, facing up, at your right side.
  2. Put your baby’s head near your right nipple and support their back and legs under your right arm.
  3. Hold the base of your baby’s head with your right palm. A pillow underneath your right arm can help support your baby’s weight.
  4. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Bring baby to you instead.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Cradle Hold

  1. For the right breast, cradle your baby with your right arm. Your baby will be on their left side across your lap, facing you at nipple level.
  2. Your baby’s head will rest on your right forearm with your baby’s back along your inner arm and palm.
  3. Turn your baby’s tummy toward your tummy. Your left hand is free to support your breast, if needed. Pillows can help support your arm and elbow.
  4. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Instead, bring your baby to you.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Laid-Back Hold

  1. Lean back on a pillow with your baby’s tummy touching yours and their head at breast level. Some moms find that sitting up nearly straight works well. Others prefer to lean back and lie almost flat.
  2. You can place your baby’s cheek near your breast, or you may want to use one hand to hold your breast near your baby. It’s up to you and what you think feels best.
  3. Your baby will naturally find your nipple, latch, and begin to suckle.

This hold is useful when: