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Celebrate Spring with Eggs: Eggy Omelet Pie

March 16, 2022 General /FamilyRecipes

Eggs are inexpensive, available year round, and they’re packed with protein and choline — a B vitamin important for good brain health. Eggs are also versatile. You can scramble them for breakfast, serve our Chirp, Chirp Deviled Eggs for a snack or lunch, or combine them with springtime vegetables for our Eggy Omelet Pie at dinner.

Getting young children to eat their vegetables without a fuss can be a struggle, but if you serve them with familiar foods like eggs and serve them in a pie, some kids may be more willing to take a bite! For this recipe, we combine fresh asparagus with eggs and cheese for a giant omelet that you can cut into playful pie pieces. The best thing about this omelet is that you never have to flip it.

Makes 4 to 6 Servings

TIP: To determine the size of your skillet, use a ruler to measure across the top.

Nutrition Information per Serving (1/5th of the pie):

170 calories, 13g fat (4g saturated), 250mg sodium, 4g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 14g protein, 15% vitamin A, 30% calcium

How to Make Perfect Hard Boiled Eggs

Have you ever seen hard-boiled eggs with a green-gray ring around the yolk? It’s not very pretty; after all, the yolks should be yellow! To avoid an unappetizing ring, it’s important to avoid overcooking your eggs and to chill them as soon as they’re done. For a perfect egg every time, follow these four steps eggs-actly:

Side-Lying Hold

  1. For the right breast, lie on your right side with your baby facing you.
  2. Pull your baby close. Your baby’s mouth should be level with your nipple.
  3. In this position, you can cradle your baby’s back with your left arm and support yourself with your right arm and/or pillows.
  4. Keep loose clothing and bedding away from your baby.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Cross-Cradle Hold

  1. For the right breast, use your left arm to hold your baby’s head at your right breast and baby’s body toward your left side. A pillow across your lap can help support your left arm.
  2. Gently place your left hand behind your baby’s ears and neck, with your thumb and index finger behind each ear and your palm between baby’s shoulder blades. Turn your baby’s body toward yours so your tummies are touching.
  3. Hold your breast as if you are squeezing a sandwich. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Instead, bring your baby to you.
  4. As your baby’s mouth opens, push gently with your left palm on baby’s head to help them latch on. Make sure you keep your fingers out of the way.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Clutch or “Football” Hold

  1. For the right breast, hold your baby level, facing up, at your right side.
  2. Put your baby’s head near your right nipple and support their back and legs under your right arm.
  3. Hold the base of your baby’s head with your right palm. A pillow underneath your right arm can help support your baby’s weight.
  4. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Bring baby to you instead.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Cradle Hold

  1. For the right breast, cradle your baby with your right arm. Your baby will be on their left side across your lap, facing you at nipple level.
  2. Your baby’s head will rest on your right forearm with your baby’s back along your inner arm and palm.
  3. Turn your baby’s tummy toward your tummy. Your left hand is free to support your breast, if needed. Pillows can help support your arm and elbow.
  4. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Instead, bring your baby to you.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Laid-Back Hold

  1. Lean back on a pillow with your baby’s tummy touching yours and their head at breast level. Some moms find that sitting up nearly straight works well. Others prefer to lean back and lie almost flat.
  2. You can place your baby’s cheek near your breast, or you may want to use one hand to hold your breast near your baby. It’s up to you and what you think feels best.
  3. Your baby will naturally find your nipple, latch, and begin to suckle.

This hold is useful when: